HOW TO MAKE YOUR CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS LOVE READING

HOW TO MAKE YOUR CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS LOVE READING

Many parents, guardians and instructors have tried to influence their children or wards to love reading but all their efforts just doesn’t seem to yield anything. From personal experience, getting children to read is like telling a child to take a very bitter medicine. Both processes seem unpleasant but ultimately beneficial.

But because this task is difficult does not mean you should give aaup on it. This is because helping your child/ward love reading as a habit is one of the best gifts you can give the child. There are some steps you can take to improve the chances of your children or wards picking up a book to read.

Probably the most effective way is to create a receptive environment for them. What do I mean by a receptive environment? A receptive environment is one where the teenagers are surrounded with people and things that speak “books”. A receptive environment includes the parents and guardians having a good attitude towards reading themselves s– an attitude of excitement. If parents and guardians regard reading as drudgery, the same attitude will reflect on the children.

The best way of influencing children is by example. That’s why the best model of leadership is by Modelling. Children often do what we say but they do what they see us do – they are imitators. Many things are better caught than taught. Entrepreneur Dan Lok said, “Your environment is more powerful than your willpower”. Surround teenagers with people and things that will challenge them to read more. Instead of allowing gadgets and toys to be lying around all the time, letting books lie around is also a good strategy.

After creating a receptive environment, we have to make SUSTAIANABILITY our goal. Many parents wish their 7 year old will finish reading the Britannica Encyclopedia in 3 days and probably remember what’s on each page by rote. But we know that’s not how life works, most times. Everything is done step by step. Rome wasn’t built in a day and your child won’t become a reading genius in 3 days. Encourage them to read a 3 paged book first. Then a short story. Then a 50 paged book and you will be surprised to see them taking up the Harry Potter series.

It’s not a mystery that people do things because they want to. Compulsion works but not all the time. With this in mind, giving your teenagers articles or books on themes or subjects they love will go a long way in encouraging them to read. It’s like giving them a chocolate bar, they will always ask for more. You don’t expect a teenager who hates Maths to ask for a book on Calculus.

So we have ensured that our teenagers read sustainably within a receptive environment, so what’s the place of motivation? Human beings are individuals hungry for motivation and encouragement and your job as a parent or guardian is to supply it. Leadership expert and multiple times bestselling author John C. Maxwell said his father pays him each time he completes a book – this singular action might double the reading rate of most teenagers. Yes, there might be a downside to this in the long run because the teenager might be money-driven but doing this with wisdom and consistent conversation will help the child understand that the knowledge and wisdom gotten from reading is far more important than the money and can bring a thousand fold returns if applied well.

Motivation is not only limited to money. Words are also potent. Infact, motivation through words is more effective and parents and instructors should use it aggressively.

Applying these suggestions to your children and teenagers might not make them finish the encyclopedia in 3 days but it will sure make them motivated to pick up Tim Ferriss’ “Tool of Titans” and finish it in a few weeks. The process might be challenging but it is well worth it.

Many parents, guardians and instructors have tried to influence their children or wards to love reading but all their efforts just doesn’t seem to yield anything. From personal experience, getting children to read is like telling a child to take a very bitter medicine. Both processes seem unpleasant but ultimately beneficial.

But because this task is difficult does not mean you should give aaup on it. This is because helping your child/ward love reading as a habit is one of the best gifts you can give the child. There are some steps you can take to improve the chances of your children or wards picking up a book to read.

Probably the most effective way is to create a receptive environment for them. What do I mean by a receptive environment? A receptive environment is one where the teenagers are surrounded with people and things that speak “books”. A receptive environment includes the parents and guardians having a good attitude towards reading themselves s– an attitude of excitement. If parents and guardians regard reading as drudgery, the same attitude will reflect on the children.

The best way of influencing children is by example. That’s why the best model of leadership is by Modelling. Children often do what we say but they do what they see us do – they are imitators. Many things are better caught than taught. Entrepreneur Dan Lok said, “Your environment is more powerful than your willpower”. Surround teenagers with people and things that will challenge them to read more. Instead of allowing gadgets and toys to be lying around all the time, letting books lie around is also a good strategy.

After creating a receptive environment, we have to make SUSTAIANABILITY our goal. Many parents wish their 7 year old will finish reading the Britannica Encyclopedia in 3 days and probably remember what’s on each page by rote. But we know that’s not how life works, most times. Everything is done step by step. Rome wasn’t built in a day and your child won’t become a reading genius in 3 days. Encourage them to read a 3 paged book first. Then a short story. Then a 50 paged book and you will be surprised to see them taking up the Harry Potter series.

It’s not a mystery that people do things because they want to. Compulsion works but not all the time. With this in mind, giving your teenagers articles or books on themes or subjects they love will go a long way in encouraging them to read. It’s like giving them a chocolate bar, they will always ask for more. You don’t expect a teenager who hates Maths to ask for a book on Calculus.

So we have ensured that our teenagers read sustainably within a receptive environment, so what’s the place of motivation? Human beings are individuals hungry for motivation and encouragement and your job as a parent or guardian is to supply it. Leadership expert and multiple times bestselling author John C. Maxwell said his father pays him each time he completes a book – this singular action might double the reading rate of most teenagers. Yes, there might be a downside to this in the long run because the teenager might be money-driven but doing this with wisdom and consistent conversation will help the child understand that the knowledge and wisdom gotten from reading is far more important than the money and can bring a thousand fold returns if applied well.

Motivation is not only limited to money. Words are also potent. Infact, motivation through words is more effective and parents and instructors should use it aggressively.

Applying these suggestions to your children and teenagers might not make them finish the encyclopedia in 3 days but it will sure make them motivated to pick up Tim Ferriss’ “Tool of Titans” and finish it in a few weeks. The process might be challenging but it is well worth it.

Many parents, guardians and instructors have tried to influence their children or wards to love reading but all their efforts just doesn’t seem to yield anything. From personal experience, getting children to read is like telling a child to take a very bitter medicine. Both processes seem unpleasant but ultimately beneficial.

But because this task is difficult does not mean you should give aaup on it. This is because helping your child/ward love reading as a habit is one of the best gifts you can give the child. There are some steps you can take to improve the chances of your children or wards picking up a book to read.

Probably the most effective way is to create a receptive environment for them. What do I mean by a receptive environment? A receptive environment is one where the teenagers are surrounded with people and things that speak “books”. A receptive environment includes the parents and guardians having a good attitude towards reading themselves s– an attitude of excitement. If parents and guardians regard reading as drudgery, the same attitude will reflect on the children.

The best way of influencing children is by example. That’s why the best model of leadership is by Modelling. Children often do what we say but they do what they see us do – they are imitators. Many things are better caught than taught. Entrepreneur Dan Lok said, “Your environment is more powerful than your willpower”. Surround teenagers with people and things that will challenge them to read more. Instead of allowing gadgets and toys to be lying around all the time, letting books lie around is also a good strategy.

After creating a receptive environment, we have to make SUSTAIANABILITY our goal. Many parents wish their 7 year old will finish reading the Britannica Encyclopedia in 3 days and probably remember what’s on each page by rote. But we know that’s not how life works, most times. Everything is done step by step. Rome wasn’t built in a day and your child won’t become a reading genius in 3 days. Encourage them to read a 3 paged book first. Then a short story. Then a 50 paged book and you will be surprised to see them taking up the Harry Potter series.

It’s not a mystery that people do things because they want to. Compulsion works but not all the time. With this in mind, giving your teenagers articles or books on themes or subjects they love will go a long way in encouraging them to read. It’s like giving them a chocolate bar, they will always ask for more. You don’t expect a teenager who hates Maths to ask for a book on Calculus.

So we have ensured that our teenagers read sustainably within a receptive environment, so what’s the place of motivation? Human beings are individuals hungry for motivation and encouragement and your job as a parent or guardian is to supply it. Leadership expert and multiple times bestselling author John C. Maxwell said his father pays him each time he completes a book – this singular action might double the reading rate of most teenagers. Yes, there might be a downside to this in the long run because the teenager might be money-driven but doing this with wisdom and consistent conversation will help the child understand that the knowledge and wisdom gotten from reading is far more important than the money and can bring a thousand fold returns if applied well.

Motivation is not only limited to money. Words are also potent. Infact, motivation through words is more effective and parents and instructors should use it aggressively.

Applying these suggestions to your children and teenagers might not make them finish the encyclopedia in 3 days but it will sure make them motivated to pick up Tim Ferriss’ “Tool of Titans” and finish it in a few weeks. The process might be challenging but it is well worth it.

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